Review of Lullaby 6 “For Duane” premiere performance:

“Lullaby 6 is a masterly work of complex composition and, in this performance, well-matched to the imposing talents of the soloist” - Paul Muller, Sequenza 21

[full review]



New York Times review of wild Up performance of a new(er) anxiety at Roulette

Nicholas Deyoe’s “A New Anxiety” contrasted filigree lightness and explosive loudness (and a hyper-amplified bassoonist, Archie Carey) without seeming to strain for effect.” - Zachary Woolfe

[full review]



Bachtrack review of wild Up performance of a new(er) anxiety at Roulette

“Deyoe’s “A New Anxiety” delivered on its title: it was one of the most terrifying pieces I’ve ever heard. Special effects, via special electronic hookups and foot pedals, entrusted to bassoonist Archie Carey contributed to a sonic portrait of the end of the world.” - Daniel Christiansen

[full review]



Review of Matt Barbier’s Face | Resection in The Wire

“Both compositions (one by Nicholas Deyoe, the second by Clint McCallum) involve chunky noise blocks being manipulated in at least three dimensions.  They can be ominously rattling slabs of vibrating granite or something more akin to power tools gone wild.  Both approaches make for some very pleasant listening.” 

- The Wire



Matt Barbier’s Face | Resection included in Alex Ross’ “New and recent releases of interest.”



New Yorker story on HOPSCOTCH

“Elsewhere on the Yellow Route, the composer-guitarist Nicholas Deyoe, who co-directs an adventurous new-music series called wasteLAnd, has by now given more than a hundred limo-bound renditions of “Wedding,” a voice-and-electric-guitar piece by his colleague Andrew McIntosh. He’s learned to tailor his playing to the vagaries of the route: when he senses that the car is coming to a stop, he waits a moment to attempt a particularly precarious harmonic. (The instrument has been restrung and tuned to a microtonal scale.) Deyoe told me, “I did a lot of practicing while sitting back on my couch, because I figured it would force me to get used to playing with bad posture.”” - Alex Ross

[full story]



Review of wild Up’s Academy of the West PULP concert, including a new anxiety:

“The final work, "a new anxiety" by Nicholas Deyoe, was violently loud. Earplugs were handed out, although I didn't notice anyone using them. Ferocious climaxes, composed of complex, raw instrumental textures, were too compelling to dull. Video accompaniment showed the oranges sliced, smushed, their juice flowing like blood” - Mark Swed, LA Times

[full review]



Review of Richard Valitutto’s Piano Spheres Recital, including world premiere of NCTRN:

The premiere of Nicholas Deyoe's NCTRN closed the show with a true trip into the darkness. It kicks alive with just a big, low dense thud. Then these shifty clusters come out to play, paired with a prepared click, tapped or trilled over and over. Deyoe has a way of composing his clusters so they're really lyrical, bel canto. It's just the way the voices groove this way and that, parsimoniously but still with a feeling for line, like a dozen tiny arias stuffed into seemingly brutal chords. Very moving, and strange. The piece leaves off with the feverishly persistent prepared clicks growing loud and unrelenting, a sinister presence tapping at the windowsill. - The Artificialist

[full review]



Review of gnarwhallaby’s west coast premiere of Lullaby 4 at the Neighborhood Church, Pasadena, CA:

“Listening to Lullaby 4 is like walking down an unfamiliar alley in the dark and being attacked by an unseen assailant – definitely music to keep you on the edge of your seat and an emotionally draining experience.” Paul Muller, Sequenza 21

[full review]



Review of wasteLAnd premiere of ERSTICKEND:

Nicholas Deyoe’s Erstickend for two cellos and percussion, another premiere, spun an intricate web of epic proportions out of a skittering three-note motive. Ashley Walters and Derek Stein infused their cello parts with the requisite ferocity, while percussionist Ryan Nestor’s rhythmic interjections added even more tension. The piece concludes with a violent crescendo and snare drum roll — would it be churlish to point out the orthodox effectiveness of this ending? - Isaac Schankler, New Music Box

[full review]



Review of with throbbing eyes:

“ ‘...for every day is another view of the tentative past’ is challenging listening by any standard, but this music is like a carefully woven tapestry that gives up its secrets with closer inspection. The controlled and disciplined playing of the Formalist Quartet is critical to the success of this, but attentive listening to this work more than repays the effort. I can’t remember a piece that revealed more on the second or third hearing. For all its complexity and intricacy, this will be a very satisfying listening experience for those who are willing to make the effort.” - Paul Muller, Sequenza 21

[full review]



Review of gnarwhallaby performance of Lullaby 4 at Zankel Hall

“Nicholas Deyoe’s “Lullaby 4,” played by the startlingly versatile gnarwhallaby, a California quartet in matching black outfits, murmured and pounced with the spontaneity of free improvisation, yet always conveyed the sense of a firm guiding hand.” - Steve Smith, NY Times

[full review]



Review of Formalist Quartet (with Erika Duke-Kirkpatrick) premiere of Lullaby 3.

intriguingly complex and excitedly lush” - Mark Swed, LA Times

[full review]



with throbbing eyes was included in Alex Ross’s Nightafternight Playlist:

[The Rest is Noise]



Review of with throbbing eyes:

Here and elsewhere, Deyoe chooses the road less traveled, eschewing the predictable and familiar for a style less immediately accessible but nevertheless rewarding. Though With Throbbing Eyes documents a voice in its still-developing stage, it's an impressive debut that bodes well for Deyoe's future.

- Textura

[full review]



Review of La Jolla Symphony performance of still getting rid of featuring Stephanie Aston and Leslie Leytham:

It was so powerful, in the Brahms symphony that followed (especially in the opening of the first movement), it wasn’t that you could hear how Brahms may have influenced Deyoe; you could hear the Deyoe in Brahms.

-James Chute, San Diego Union Tribune

[full review]



Review of May 12, 2012 wild Up performance including my piece a new anxiety.

“...and delivered the decibels and joyful exuberance one might expect from such a request.”

- Out West Arts

[full review]



Review of my CD with throbbing eyes:

...as if acknowledging the beauty in the world, the higher calling of a mannered life, before strewing it aside like an overcoat of shame

-Richard Allen, a closer listen

[full review]



Profile/concert publicity leading into La Jolla Symphony performance:

Unless you are a very careful listener, however, you may be hard-pressed to hear the influence of the Polish death-metal band Decapitated in the opening section of Deyoe’s new work, “still getting rid of.” Much of Deyoe’s music is extremely challenging, employing microtonality, flexible intonation, complex rhythms and polyphonic textures.

-James Chute, San Diego Union Tribune

[read article]